The Digital & Fashion Life of Teen Girls

  1. The Digital Fashion Life of Teen Girl

For generations past, time with friends necessitated physically spending time together.  While the best friendship experiences still rely on that proximity, today’s teen girls more often connect to their friends digitally.

Those same digital connections give a teen girl greater access to the clothing brands that allow her to express herself. The brands she likes are most often the brands her friends like; after all, a major part of being a teen is knowing yourself within the comfort of a peer group. However, as important to a teen girl is her desire to express herself as an individual.

In that quest for individuality teen girls use the internet. They can read the fashion section of their favorite magazine, see images of the clothes their favorite musicians are wearing, browse what’s new on fashion websites, and create their own style on interactive internet retailers – all the while digitally updating, seeking advice from, and showing off for – their friends.

The Digital Fashion Life of Teen Girls

Note: All info from Feb March Tracker – Teen girls

  • When compared to other screens, the #1 screen teen girls spend most of their time after school using is a Mobile Device/phone (55%). ( p.  72)
  • 24% of teen girls say the best thing about their favorite website is socializing (#1).  For all kids who say that, 71%  list Facebook as their favorite website, 11% Twitter and 3% Tumblr. (p. 44)
  • 68% of teen girls use the internet many times a day. (p. 45).
  • When teen girls read a magazine their #1 favorite section is Fashion/Style 35%.  (p. 32).
  • The #1 ‘next thing’ that teen girls are saving for is clothes (17%), #2 is shoes (10%).
  • Their Top 3 coolest brand of shoes/sneakers are
    • Nike (#1- 19%)
    • Converse (#2- 17%)
    • Vans (#3-17%). (p. 69)
  • Forever 21 (#1- 14%), Hollister (#2- 13%), and Aeropostale (#3- 10%) are their favorite brands of clothes. (p. 64)
  • “What is one word that describes your style?”
    Girls 12-15 years old n= 288
    casual
    unique
    swag
    cute
    awesome
    different
    fashionable
    comfortable
    cool
    classy
    hip/hipster
    9.0
    6.9
    5.9
    5.6
    3.8
    3.5
    3.5
    3.1
    3.1
    2.4
    2.4

  • Looking closely we see that Unique #2 (7%) and Different #6 (4%) when combined will top the chart. This is evidence that the teen girl strives to find a sense of individuality through her style. When it comes to fashion the more variety a brand offers the more creative the teen girl can be.This helps a teen girl decide on what brands they lean towards. The top brands that teen girls choose offer such diversity.

 

Terence Burke

Terence Burke

SVP of Research, Editor-in-Chief KidSay's Trend Tracker at KidSay
Terence Burke is one of America’s leading kid experts. He is co-creator of KidSay’s Trend Tracker, a noted research report that many of the world’s most successful companies rely upon to understand kids and their rapidly-changing world. As the Trend Tracker’s editor-in-chief and principle writer since its inception, Terence has disseminated his kid-market expertise since 1999. The knowledge and insight Terence has acquired in his role as Trend Tracker editor and KidSay’s Senior VP of Research has led to multiple invitations to speak at Nickelodeon, Disney, McDonald’s, Reebok, Build-A-Bear, Activision, Kraft and Hasbro, among others. In addition to his research experience Terence has a Master’s degree in Therapeutic Education. He spent over two decades teaching emotionally handicapped students and, most recently, teaching inner-city youth at DreamYard High School in the Bronx, NY. Terence’s proudest achievements are being a husband to Katherine and a father to Alden, Selby, and Tristan.
Terence Burke
About the Author

Terence Burke

Terence Burke is one of America’s leading kid experts. He is co-creator of KidSay’s Trend Tracker, a noted research report that many of the world’s most successful companies rely upon to understand kids and their rapidly-changing world. As the Trend Tracker’s editor-in-chief and principle writer since its inception, Terence has disseminated his kid-market expertise since 1999. The knowledge and insight Terence has acquired in his role as Trend Tracker editor and KidSay’s Senior VP of Research has led to multiple invitations to speak at Nickelodeon, Disney, McDonald’s, Reebok, Build-A-Bear, Activision, Kraft and Hasbro, among others. In addition to his research experience Terence has a Master’s degree in Therapeutic Education. He spent over two decades teaching emotionally handicapped students and, most recently, teaching inner-city youth at DreamYard High School in the Bronx, NY. Terence’s proudest achievements are being a husband to Katherine and a father to Alden, Selby, and Tristan.