Teen Girls ‘Unliking’ Facebook

Facebook’s Fall from Atop Teen Girls’ Favorite Websites Nearly Complete

  1. Teen Girls 'Unliking' Facebook

Facebook’s fall from its once dominant perch atop the list of teen girls’ favorite websites is nearly complete. The social network giant, once the go-to website for teens, is now just a bit player in their media world. Facebook’s drop is not a sign that teens are moving away from social media. They aren’t – and probably never will. It’s just that Facebook is no longer ‘the’ site by which to digitally connect. That place is Instagram. Instagram’s image-based, mobile-centric, relatively parent-free vibe makes it much ‘cooler’ than Facebook.

How far has Facebook fallen?

In 2012, 79% of American girls ages 12-15 told KidSay that they used Facebook. Today, only 49% of them say they do. That drop is only one sign of Facebook’s troubles. A better indicator is the drop in those who say it’s their web destination of choice. At its height (June 2011), 69% of girls 12-15 told KidSay that Facebook was their favorite website. Only 7% say that today.

Why? Because for many teen girls, Facebook has become a functional site – not a fun one. It’s a place of obligation, a place to check-in to ensure that they haven’t missed anything before they head back to the sites they want to be on – Instagram or Twitter.

The irony of Facebook’s fall is that, once again, it’s poised to be ‘the new Myspace’. In June 2007, it was Myspace that was the essential social media platform of kids, with 60% of girls 12-15 telling KidSay that Myspace was their favorite website. By September of that year, those girls began to note Facebook’s rise, and KidSay soon followed by trumpeting Facebook as ‘the new Myspace’. By June 2011, girls 12-15 were no longer naming Myspace as a favorite site, and Facebook was at its high point.

Will Facebook be gone from teen girls’ social media rotation in a year or two? While once unfathomable, it’s now a distinct possibility.

 

Terence Burke

Terence Burke

SVP of Research, Editor-in-Chief KidSay's Trend Tracker at KidSay
Terence Burke is one of America’s leading kid experts. He is co-creator of KidSay’s Trend Tracker, a noted research report that many of the world’s most successful companies rely upon to understand kids and their rapidly-changing world. As the Trend Tracker’s editor-in-chief and principle writer since its inception, Terence has disseminated his kid-market expertise since 1999. The knowledge and insight Terence has acquired in his role as Trend Tracker editor and KidSay’s Senior VP of Research has led to multiple invitations to speak at Nickelodeon, Disney, McDonald’s, Reebok, Build-A-Bear, Activision, Kraft and Hasbro, among others. In addition to his research experience Terence has a Master’s degree in Therapeutic Education. He spent over two decades teaching emotionally handicapped students and, most recently, teaching inner-city youth at DreamYard High School in the Bronx, NY. Terence’s proudest achievements are being a husband to Katherine and a father to Alden, Selby, and Tristan.
Terence Burke
About the Author

Terence Burke

Terence Burke is one of America’s leading kid experts. He is co-creator of KidSay’s Trend Tracker, a noted research report that many of the world’s most successful companies rely upon to understand kids and their rapidly-changing world. As the Trend Tracker’s editor-in-chief and principle writer since its inception, Terence has disseminated his kid-market expertise since 1999. The knowledge and insight Terence has acquired in his role as Trend Tracker editor and KidSay’s Senior VP of Research has led to multiple invitations to speak at Nickelodeon, Disney, McDonald’s, Reebok, Build-A-Bear, Activision, Kraft and Hasbro, among others. In addition to his research experience Terence has a Master’s degree in Therapeutic Education. He spent over two decades teaching emotionally handicapped students and, most recently, teaching inner-city youth at DreamYard High School in the Bronx, NY. Terence’s proudest achievements are being a husband to Katherine and a father to Alden, Selby, and Tristan.