Kid Immersion at The Marketing Store Highlights

Marketing 101 says ‘Know Your Customer.’  KidSay’s mission is to help you do just that. We do it figuratively with KidSay’s Trend Tracker and with customized quantitative and qualitative studies. On special occasions we do it literally, bringing kids and their world, into your world, via Kid Immersion Experiences.

KidSay just completed a Kid Immersion Experience at the Chicago headquarters of The Marketing Store. Many of America’s leading kid-focused companies saw first-hand that being a part of a child’s physical and emotional world is invaluable to appreciating who they are.

Hosting a Kid Immersion Experience allows you and your team to gain visceral knowledge about kids. It gives you a ‘feel’ for a kid’s world by allowing you to tap into their energy, observe their behavior and simply engage them in conversation.

Consisting of a custom presentation on kids and your market, an interactive immersion experience that both inspires and challenges your team, and a live panel discussion with kids and their moms, a Kid Immersion Experience (KIE) is an event that is sure to leave you thinking, feeling and knowing the world of kids. It’s not just Marketing 101. It’s a Marketing PhD.

Boys 6-8: Bedroom Playground

  • The bedroom of a 6-8 year old boy is the place where he’s ‘fully boy’. That means play – fun play, fantasy play, fiery play.
  • Sure, he’s got to sleep, so he should have a bed. And yes, he’s got to be dressed, so he needs a place for his clothes.  But does he care about them? NO! But wait, his dresser can be a mountain! Under his bed – a cave!! His closet – a fortress!!! Now that’s more like it.

The Boy in the Bedroom Plyground is:    

  • strongly attached to his sex-role ID (“Is that pink? I don’t want that. I CAN’T have that.”)
  • creating the ‘ideal’ self (“That superhero, that WWE wrestler, that superstar athlete – that’s the ME I’ll be!”)
  • rejecting the ‘baby-ish’ (“I used to like Bob the Builder but that’s for my little brother now. I don’t like it.”)
  • beginning to apply logic to situations (“How does Spider-Man do that? Oh, he’s got radioactive blood! I get it.”)
  • thinking, learning, flourishing AT PLAY (“Zoom – crash – bang – YEAH!”)

The Bedroom Playground allows a boy to be a boy. Everything in here that he values he values because it stimulates his imagination, it engages his body, it gives him FUN THROUGH PLAY!
Essential Questions:

  • Are you sparking his playful imagination?
  • Are you giving him ‘fun’?
  • Are you helping him be the powerful, ‘ideal boy’ he wants to be?

Girls 6-8: A Girlie-Girl Cocoon

The 6-8 year old girl is inventing herself, preparing to move from ‘little girl’ to ‘young lady’. One place she does a lot of that work is here, in her Girlie-Girl Cocoon.

She’s ensconced in this comfortable space, surrounded by the things she most loves being engaged with – and using her imagination to help her create the world she wants to live in.

The Girl in the Girlie-Girl Cocoon is :

  • strongly attached to his sex-role ID (“Is that pink? Then it’s definitely for me!.”)
  • creating the ‘ideal’ self (“Which Disney Princess is most me? Belle? Tiana? Selena?”)
  • rejecting the ‘baby-ish’ (“I used to like Dora the Explorer but that’s for my little sister now. I don’t like it.”)
  • beginning to apply logic to situations (“How did Ariel get the Prince? By overcoming the spell with the help of her friends, of course!”)
  • thinking, learning, flourishing AT PLAY (“I’m the Mommy. You, Squishy Bear, are the Dad. Barbie, you’re our daughter. Let’s pretend.”)

The Girlie-Girl Cocoon allows a girl to play at the girl she wants to become. By creating her world of play, she’s practicing and honing the skills she’ll use to navigate the next phase of her life – and enjoying every stage of that process.

Essential Questions:

  • Are you seeing her as she sees herself ?
  • Are you engaging her imagination in the realm of fantasy?
  • Are you inspiring her to create a world all her own?

Boys 9-11: The Mini Man Cave

The Mini Man Cave gives the 9-11 year old boy HIS place.

It’s a place where he can unwind from his increasingly hectic days, a place where he can be ‘wound up’ while lost in the virtual reality of his video game world.  It’s his playground, his clubhouse, his locker room, his Mini-Man Cave.

The Boy in this Mini Man Cave is:

  • becoming fully engaged in social groups (“I’m playing on a basketball team and I’m in a Boy Scout troop.”)
  • enjoying their new ability to juggle mental variables (“I don’t need MORE hockey cards, I need Hosa and Kane to have ALL the Blackhawks.”)
  • developing a more realistic self image (“I’m the back-up point guard on my team. I might not play for the Bulls.”)
  • valuing peer judgments more frequently (“Will my friends think  I’m cool and that I’ve got cool stuff?”)
  • measuring their success or failure in the social realm (“Am I worthy – In school? On the field? With the Controller?” )

The Mini Man Cave allows a boy to enjoy the competition he craves while allowing instant feedback on his competence – which is why the VIDEO GAME CONSOLE is the perfect center of his Mini Man Cave universe.

Essential Questions:

  • Are you finding your way into his universe?
  • Are you allowing him to feel competent? Triumphant?
  • Are you inspiring him to rise to a fun challenge?

Girls 9-11: Comforting Connection Zone

The bedroom of a 9-11 year old girl is the place where she is in her glory, ESPECIALLY when surrounded by her friends.
This place is her safety zone, a place of comfort that she’s made her own. It’s here that she can connect and care for all around her – her stuffed animals, her pet hamster, and at its best, her friends.  It’s the place where she’s comforted by her past, happy in her present, and inspired by her future.

The Girl in this Comforting Connection Zone is :

  • becoming fully engaged in social groups (“I’m playing on a soccer team, a member of Girl Scouts, and taking dance lessons.”)
  • enjoying their new ability to juggle mental variables (“Grandma, can you get me a snow globe from your city? I want one from everywhere I’ve travelled”)
  • developing a more realistic self image (“I didn’t get lead dancer in our recital. Maybe I won’t become a Prima Ballerina at the Joffrey”)
  • valuing peer judgments more frequently (“Will my friends think I’m nice and my clothes are ‘in’?)
  • measuring their success or failure in the social realm (“Will Chrissy invite me to her party? Will Jacquie ask me to sit with her at the lunch table?”)

This Comforting Connection Zone allows a girl to foster the connection she craves. When her friends are around she knows she’s successful at what she wants to be – CONNECTED TO and CARING FOR others.

Essential Questions:

  • Are you connecting to her – and allowing her to connect to you?
  • Are you making her feel a part of a larger world of others?
  • Are you inspiring her to care for herself, for others, for the world?
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